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Thursday, May 14, 2020 | History

2 edition of Occupational exposure to hydrogen sulfide found in the catalog.

Occupational exposure to hydrogen sulfide

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

Occupational exposure to hydrogen sulfide

by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

  • 161 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published by Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, Center Disease Control, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, for sale by the Supt. of Doc., U.S. Govt. Print. Off. in [Cincinnati, Ohio], Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Hydrogen sulfide -- Toxicology

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesCriteria for a recommended standard : occupational exposure to hydrogen sulfide
    SeriesCriteria for a recommended standard, DHEW publication ; no. (NIOSH) 77-158, DHEW publication -- no. (NIOSH) 77-158
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 149 p. :
    Number of Pages149
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15397975M

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is responsible for many incidents of occupational toxic exposure, especially in the petroleum industry. The clinical effects of H(2)S depend on its concentration and the.   Hydrogen sulfide occurs naturally and is also produced by human activities. Just a few breaths of air containing high levels of hydrogen sulfide gas can cause death. Lower, longer-term exposure .

    Description: "The recommended standard is given limiting employee exposure to less than 15 milligrams of hydrogen-sulfide () per cubic meter of air (10ppm) during a 10 minute sampling period for . The risk of hydrogen-sulfide () exposure to workers with tympanic membrane defects (perforated eardrums) is reviewed. Several statutes and recommendations exclude workers with perforated eardrums from being occupationally exposed to hydrogen-sulfide.

    In occupational settings, severe health effects (for example, loss of consciousness and death) have been reported due to accidental, acute exposure of workers to high levels of hydrogen sulfide. These exposure . Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is a colorless, rapidly acting, highly poisonous gas or liquid that has an odor of bitter almonds. Most HCN is used as an intermediate at the site of production. Major uses include the .


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Occupational exposure to hydrogen sulfide by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Download PDF EPUB FB2

Except for slight dizziness. Accidental mixing of acid with sulfide solutions in a tannery [24,35], or in sewer lines [36,37], resulted in the release of enough hydrogen sulfide (concentrations unknown) to. Exposure to hydrogen sulfide may cause irritation to the eyes and respiratory system.

It can also cause apnea, coma, convulsions; dizziness, headache, weakness, irritability, insomnia; stomach upset, and if liquid: frostbite. Occupational exposure to hydrogen sulfide occurs in the agricultural, gas, oil-refining, and other industries, and workers often notice the characteristic rotten-egg odor associated with exposure.

Get this from a library. Occupational exposure to hydrogen sulfide. [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.] Book: All Authors / Contributors: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

OCLC Number: Notes: May # Occupational Exposure. In addition, hydrogen sulfide gas burns and produces other toxic vapors and gases, such as sulfur dioxide. In addition to exposure to hydrogen sulfide in the air, exposure to liquid hydrogen sulfide can cause "blue skin" or frostbite. Test (monitor) the air for hydrogen sulfide.

This must be done by a qualified person. Use the right test equipment, such as an electronic meter that detects hydrogen sulfide gas. Conduct air monitoring prior to and at regular times during any work activity where hydrogen sulfide exposure. Industries and locations where occupational exposure to H 2 S may be present include: • Gas plants.

• Oil and gas wells. • Refineries. • Pulp mills. • Sewers. • Commercial laboratories. • Petrochemical plants. • Oil batteries. Best Practices to Guard Against Hydrogen Sulfide File Size: 1MB.

18 rows    IX. Appendix I – Air Sampling Method for Hydrogen Sulfide:. Occupational exposure to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and the medical management of H2S-associated toxicity remains a problem in the sour gas industry and some other industrial settings.

The acute effects of exposure to H2S are well recognized, but accurate exposure Cited by: Monitoring Worker Exposures to Hydrogen Sulfide Traditionally, the Department of Government Services, Occupational Health and Safety Branch, automatically adopted as occupational exposure.

Symptoms. irritation eyes, respiratory system; apnea, coma, convulsions; conjunctivitis, eye pain, lacrimation (discharge of tears), photophobia (abnormal visual intolerance to light), corneal vesiculation; dizziness, headache, lassitude (weakness, exhaustion), irritability, insomnia; gastrointestinal disturbance.

In addition to its foul, rotten-egg stench, hydrogen-sulfide (H2S) gas is flammable and can lead to asphyxiation at concentrations above parts-per-million (ppm). To protect workers, the U.S.

Occupational Safety and Health Administration has developed a set of basic guidelines and emergency protocols for dealing with incidents that involve hydrogen sulfide. Permissible Exposure. Exposure to hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) was measured with portable direct-reading logging instruments: OdaLog (App-Tek Int.

Pty LTD, Brendale, Australia) and Dräger PAC (Drägerwerk AG & Co. Abstract Occupational exposure to hydrogen sulfide (H 2S) and the medical management of H 2S-associated toxi-city remains a problem in the sour gas industry and some other industrial settings The acute effects of exposure to H 2S are well recognized, but accurate exposure.

Sahand Rahnama-Moghadam, Richard A. Lange, in Heart and Toxins, Hydrogen Sulfide. Hydrogen sulfide is a water-soluble, colorless gas with the distinct odor of rotten eggs.

People exposed to hydrogen sulfide at concentrations above to ppm may lose the ability to smell hydrogen sulfide after 2 to 15 min of continuous exposure due to olfactory fatigue.

Hydrogen. Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is responsible for many incidents of occupational toxic exposure, especially in the petroleum industry. The clinical effects of H 2 S depend on its concentration and the duration of exposure Cited by: project on the analysis of H 2S-incidents and offered to take the lead.

H 2S is very toxic, quickly reactive, and causes serious accidents. Geothermal wells are a source of H 2S that pose specific problems. It is proposed to collect data and analyse incidents and accidents caused by hydrogen.

following subchronic inhalation exposure to hydrogen sulfide. Toxicol Pathol 28(2) Brenneman KA, Meleason DF, Sar M, et al. Olfactory mucosal necrosis in male CD rats following acute inhalation exposure to hydrogen sulfide.

Hydrogen sulfide (also known as H 2 S, sewer gas, swamp gas, stink damp, and sour damp) is a colorless gas known for its pungent "rotten egg" odor at low concentrations.

It is extremely flammable and highly toxic. Hydrogen sulfide. JOSOP – Hydrogen Sulfide Program and Procedure 4 than air and collects in low-lying, enclosed and poorly ventilated areas such as basements, manholes, underground telephone vaults, and confined spaces. The primary route of exposure File Size: KB.

Hydrogen sulphide (H 2 S is the primary chemical hazard in natural gas production in ‘sour’ gas fields. It is also a hazard in sewage treatment and manure-containment operations, construction in wetlands. The recommended standard is given limiting employee exposure to less than 15 milligrams of hydrogen-sulfide () per cubic meter of air (10ppm) during a 10 minute sampling period for up to a hour work shift in a hour workweek with evacuation of the area if the concentration equals or exceeds 70 milligrams per cubic meter.No significant changes in respiratory function or bronchial responsiveness related to exposure to hydrogen sulphide in the pulp mill workers were found.

In the asthmatic subjects, Raw was increased .